Follow Me on Pinterest

Copyright and Terms of Use Registered & Protected

Please see my NEW and updated Terms of Use for full details.

Monday, 25 August 2014

Vintage playing cards: old magazine covers, newspaper headlines and adverts

I'm a bit of a pack rat (as I'm sure you've realised) and often shop at antique shops and fairs, bric-a-brac shops, car boot sales etc. I've also got a bad habit of buying things that catch my eye, without really knowing what I'm going to do with them. Hence this set of cards, which I bought from a little shop on Richmond Hill, Richmond-upon-Thames, around 8 years ago.

The owner told me they're vintage - probably 1920s-30s, but I can't really remember the details - and I can't find anything online either! It's really frustrating...

If anyone recognises these, and what game they are for, do let me know! I think it's a form of Snap or Old Maid, but without a box or instructions, who knows?

In any case, I've put them up for sale on eBay as I'm still frantically de-stashing. I've got around 8 sets of vintage cards in all - Heaven knows what I was intending to do with them all!

Meantime, you're welcome to download these for Personal Use, if you'd like to use them in scrapbooking and projects. Just click on the pix to bring them up to full size, then right-click to copy them. They're totally unretouched, and scanned at a large size.


Friday, 22 August 2014


This Noah's Ark Card Game is dated 1920s.

Made by De La Rue, here's a snippet of the history as the inventor of the modern playing card - as we know it:

Thomas de la Rue was born in a small hamlet in Guernsey called Le Bourg in 1793, the seventh child (of nine) of Eleazar and Rachel de la Rue. At the age of ten he was apprenticed to his brother-in-law Joseph Antoine Chevalier, a master printer in St Peter Port who produced the Gazette de l'Île de Guernsey, the first printed newspaper on the island. During this period Thomas gained a thorough knowledge of printing. In 1818 he moved to London with his family and set up shop initially as a straw hat manufacturer, but he soon diversified into bookbinding and the embossing of leather, and then into paper manufacture. By around 1828 his interests had moved to playing cards and he began to put everything he had learnt into practice. De la Rue introduced letter-press printing and certain other ‘improvements’ into playing card production and was granted a patent in 1831. He produced his first playing cards in 1832 and over the years came to be recognised as the inventor of the modern English playing card.